Birth: Salem, MA in 1779

Death: Boston, MA in 1831

Historical Role/Pertinence: Richard Seavers is most known for his noble military work as a seaman. He served in the Continental Army at age 16 and fought until the end of the Revolutionary War.

Richard Seavers was a seaman who was born in Salem, Massachusetts but lived in Boston, Massachusetts after he returned from the Revolutionary War. It is known that Seavers fought in the war continuously from the time he was 16 years old. At one point during his service in the War of 1812, Richard Seaver was captured by British soldiers and held as a prisoner because he refused to fight against the United States. He was thus sentenced to time in England’s Dartmoor Prison. Seavers learned how to box during his time in the Navy and prison. He used those skills to work as a boxing instructor when he moved to Boston. Richard Seavers gained a well-known reputation for being a respectable and top-notch trainer in the Black community.

Associated Exhibits

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Works Cited

Hayden, Robert C. “African Americans in Boston: More Than 350 Years.” Internet Archive. Boston: Trustees of the Public Library, 1991. https://archive.org/details/africanamericans00hayd_0/page/10/mode/2up.

Moore, Louis. "Fit for citizenship: black sparring masters, gymnasium owners, and the white body, 1825-1886." The Journal of African American History 96, no. 4 (2011): 448+. Gale Academic OneFile, Accessed 8 December 2023. https://link.gale.com/apps/doc/A281521642/AONE?u=googlescholar&sid=bookmark-AONE&xid=d348ffab.